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When you dial 9-1-1 you expect someone to show up quickly and help right?

Well unless EMS groups can bring in more volunteers, and maintain a steady crew, that may not be so easy. But one Vermont town has identified some reasons for the lack of volunteers, and they're looking to remedy the situation.

"Probably a lot of people don't think about it until you need to," commented Charles Safford. He says emergency first response volunteers are the life-blood of a community, "When your house is on fire or you're the one having chest pains, but they perform a core, fundamental service to the community."

But the Stowe Town Manager, like many other community leaders across Vermont, is facing an on-going battle. And it's one that impacts everyone. "I realized that we're going to be in trouble soon, not being able to get our job done if we don't turn this around," stated Scott Brinkman. He's talking about the lack of EMS volunteers within the 'Ski Capital of the East'.

"We used to ask people to give one shift every week. we've started to find that can scare people away when they knock on the door. so we cut back how many hours we asked people to give each month," said the EMS Director. Brinkman is just one of 4 full-timers within the department. He says they've got a roster of 25 active volunteers. But for the 70 square miles of rugged country they cover, he wishes the number was closer to 40. "Jumping up from the dinner table, running away from family get-togethers, missing kids engagements, to be available to your community when they are in need. It's rewarding work, but it's harder and harder to find more people willing to do it at the same level we've had in the past," said Brinkman.

Both Brinkman and Safford say an aging population, time commitments, and tough EMS certification requirements are behind the decline. It takes 120 hours for a volunteer to work through the state's lowest EMS requirement, and responses levels above that require at least 80 hours to complete. "Anyone who's taken a CPR class in their life knows would tell you if they took another one today, that CPR has changed greatly over the years. That's the tip of the iceberg for EMS. All kinds of things are changing all the time in the way we handle different types of illnesses and injuries, and people have to stay current with that and keep their skills proficient so they can do a good job," he said.

It's why the town hired a consulting firm to help it come up with options. "We need to understand the trajectory of what the human resource needs are, and whether we're able to answer that through volunteers, or if we're going to continue to bring on more employees to provide the services to the level the community desires," explained Safford.

There are options. hire more full-timers, take a more regional approach, fully combine with the Fire Department. And it's the report will help the town nail-down the best outcome. But the hope is volunteers will re-emerge as the best choice. "Not everyone needs to run into a burning building, there are different roles, but it takes a special person to respond to an emergency," said Safford.

The lack of volunteers has meant that twice in 2014, and twice in 2015, there were no crews readily available to answer emergency calls. In those cases EMS crews from neighboring towns had to cover.

Stowe will get the 'volunteering report' from the consulting firm in October.

The search for missing a missing Hinesburg girl has ended on a happy note.

Hinesburg Police Chief, Frank Koss says Carissa Parent,12, of Hinesburg was found back at her home at around 4:30 p.m.

Carissa was reported missing around 11 a.m. Tuesday morning. Police notified the public about her disappearance around four hours later. According to police they were not concerned that anything suspicious had happened to her.

Police say a drone and canine search was done to help them find the girl.

"We got a drone out. Not our drone. One of the firefighters has a private drone. We searched the areas with that. Then we went ahead and called state police, protocol. They came out. They brought a k-9 out and the k-9 started to track and pretty much lead right back to the house again," said Koss.

Vermont State Police and the Hinesburg Fire Department also assisted in the search.

On Tuesday Vermont Senators Patrick Leahy, and Bernie Sanders joined a group of 20 senators in expressing their concerns about the company Mylan and the recent price hike of the EpiPen Auto-Injector.

The letter was sent to the CEO of the company Heather Bresh. In the letter, the senators raised questions about Mylan's decision to expand on their patient assistance programs.

The letter points out that Mylan has expanded its current accessibility programs which included increasing the maximum value of its savings card from $100 to $300 but the company would not reduce the EpiPen's sticker price.

In the letter, the senators also asked that the company answer a series of questions to provide more information about the price hike and how that will affect assistance programs.

The letter was signed by Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), Tammy Baldwin (D-NY), Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Barbara Boxer (D-CA), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.), Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.), Al Franken (D-Minn.), Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), Mazie K. Hirono (D-Hawaii), Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Edward Markey (D-MA), Chris Murphy (D-Conn.), Jack Reed (D-RI), Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), Jon Tester (D-Mt.), Tom Udall (D-N.M.), and Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.).

You can see the full letter below.

There's a new invasive clam species that was found in Vermont. The asian clam has been seen in Lake Bomossen. The DEC of Vermont says the clam hasn't been found in Vermont until now.

Officials say the asian clam is similar to the zebra mussel, it can form dense populations, clog intake pipes to lakeside homes, water systems, and irrigation canals.

The clam was discovered at the Vermont Fish & Wildlife's conservation camp. Results from a survey confirm the clam has been found in an isolated 14 acre in the southwest section of the lake. Officials say the clam has not been seen at any boat ramps or public beaches outside of this area.

Agency scientists say the clams have most likely been in the lake for over a year.

To keep the clam from spreading officials say boaters and anglers should always clean, drain, and dry their equipment after use.

For more information on invasive species in Vermont click here.

The Champlain Valley Fair is home to 42 rides and many games. On Local 22 and Local 44 News in the morning we took you on some of the rides that you can check out this year.

For more information about the fair you can visit the website, here. Thank you to all of the managers, directors and employees of Strates Shows who go up to take us on the rides Tuesday morning.

The Tuesday schedule is listed below:

Tuesday, August 30 - Senior Day Grandstand Entertainment -Resurrection - a Journey Tribute Free with gate admission
VT Music Showcase on the Koffee Kup Stage - Christine and Jess
Music Gazebo - John Holland All Day Fiber Arts Demonstrations Fiber Loft 10:00 Cut Flowers & Flower Arrangements accepted for judging 10:30 Horse Pulling - 3300 lbs, 20' No touch Pulling Ring 11:00 Comedic Juggler Robert Clarke Expo Plaza 11:00 Ag Mound Presentation Ag Mall 11:00 Vermont Music Showcase Adsit Mall 11:00 Early Trades Presentation Red Gate 11:30 Sheep & Shepherd Presentation Sheep Tent 11:30 McKenzie Racing Pigs Yellow Gate 12:00 Steve Bayner Adsit Mall 12:30 Cooking Demo Ware Building 12:30 Kachunga Behind Ware Building 12:30 Nerveless Nocks Midway 1:00 K-9's in Flight Ag Mall 1:00 Vermont Music Gazebo State Building Lawn 1:30 Horse Pulling - Open Distance, 1 3/4 lbs rock per lb of horse Pulling Ring 1:30 McKenzie Racing Pigs Yellow Gate 2:00 Ag Mound Presentations Ag Mound 2:00 Early Trades Presentation Red Gate 2:00 Vermont Music Showcase Adsit Mall 2:30 Kachunga Behind Ware Building 3:00 Comedic Juggler Robert Clarke Expo Plaza 3:30 Steve Bayner Adsit Mall 3:30 Cooking Demo Ware Building 3:30 McKenzie Racing Pigs Yellow Gate 4:00 K-9's in Flight Ag Mall 4:00 Nerveless Nocks Midway 4:00 Vermont Music Gazebo State Building Lawn 4:30 Judging for the Best Salsa Contest Ware Building Annex 4:30 Sheep & Shepherd Presentation Sheep Tent 5:00 Parade Thoughout Grounds 5:00 Milking Demonstrations Milking Parlor 5:30 Horse Pulling - 3100 lbs, 12' Pulling Ring 5:30 Vermont Music Showcase Adsit Mall 5:30 McKenzie Racing Pigs Yellow Gate 5:30 Cooking Demo Ware Building 6:00 Comedic Juggler Robert Clarke Expo Plaza 6:15 Vermont Music Gazebo State Building Lawn 6:30 Steve Bayner Adsit Mall 6:30 Kachunga Behind Ware Building 6:30 Ag Mound Presentation Ag Mound 6:30 Early Trades Presentation Red Gate 7:00 Nerveless Nocks Midway 7:30 K-9's in Flight Ag Mall 7:30 McKenzie Racing Pigs Yellow Gate

Good Tuesday morning!

There's another round of sunny skies on tap for Tuesday, followed up by scattered rain and a few rumbles of thunder on Wednesday. Then, we start off the month of September with a refreshingly cool dip in temperatures.

On Tuesday, high pressure crests overhead providing bright, blue skies and plenty of sunshine. Temperatures reach the upper 70s to near 80 degrees with a south wind of 5-10 mph. Late Tuesday afternoon, clouds will begin to increase, however, as a cold front approaches from the north.

Tuesday night, it's partly cloudy south to mostly cloudy north with a few showers possible right along the Canadian border. Low temperatures stall in the low 60s.

Wednesday, we won't see quite as much sunshine, but there will be a handful of breaks in the cloud cover. Throughout the day, expect scattered showers and perhaps a few thunderstorms during the afternoon and evening as the cold front sags south. High temperatures reach the upper 70s with a south wind around 10 mph.

On Thursday, a few mountain sprinkles are still in the cards through the morning, with a return to mostly sunny skies by midday. Thursday through Saturday is much cooler; high temperatures in the upper 60s to low 70s. Warmer weather returns for Sunday and Labor Day!

Have an awesome day!

-Skytracker Meteorologist Amanda Lindquist

The Winooski School District is giving students and families an extra special welcome this year.

You may have noticed a new digital sign along US Route 7. The sign, which was put in last week, displays pictures of students. It also welcomes families back to school in different languages including Nepali, Burmese and Vietnamese.

Overall, New Americans make up approximately 35 percent of the district's total student population.

"We are able to welcome all of our students and their families back to school at the beginning of the year, and we'll be able to run various messages in various languages so that everyone will have access to all the important events that are going on in our school," says W inooski School District Superintendent, Sean McMannon .

It cost about $25,000. The Parent Teacher Organization chipped in $10,000. The rest was covered by the district's capital reserve funds.

Vermont has drafted a plan to clean up Lake Champlain. The state wants to reduce the amount of phosphorus pollution entering Vermont's clean waters. At Machia & Sons Dairy farm in Sheldon, a centrifuge is removing nearly half of the phosphorus from the farm's manure and it's believed to be the only one of its kind in the Northeast. "The purpose of that is we're trying to get the phosphorus out of the watershed in this area so we can make Lake Champlain clean," says manager, Chad Machia. Phosphorus is a nutrient within fertilizer and manure. But phosphorous runoff from heavy rains can lead to toxic algae blooms in nearby water sources.

The state says agriculture accounts for about 40 percent of phosphorus pollution in Lake Champlain. "Clearly agriculture is part of the problem, and clearly agriculture has got to be part of the solution," says Vermont Agency of Agriculture Secretary, Chuck Ross. Now the state wants to help get other farms get on board by taking an aggressive step towards removing pollutants, either through advanced technology or advanced training, including nutrient management workshops. "We're going to have custom manure application training, we'll have large, medium, and small farms being inspected," says Secretary Ross. The state's goal in all this is to clean up Lake Champlain and meet new phosphorus pollution limits. But while the state wants to meet the new pollution targets set by the US Environmental Protection Agency in June, it says cleaner fertilizer and manure isn't so bad for farmers either. "Many of the things we're asking for is actually in their farming interest and improvement to their business interest as well," says Secretary Ross. According to the Lake Champlain Basin Program, the lake generates $300 million in Vermont tourism every year.

A 30-year old man faces Unlawful Trespass and Reckless Endangerment charges after police say he shot a gun after getting into a verbal argument with others.

This happened around 11:30 Monday morning in Barton.

Police say Max Pickle is homeless, he had been staying at an abandoned property on Lincoln Avenue, against the owner's wishes. It was on that street, troopers say, he shot a 45 cal. handgun.

Area schools were contacted as a precaution.

Police don't think there is any continued threat.

Pickle is due in court Tuesday.

We're in the homestretch of August and Monday night, it'll feel like September is right around the corner. High pressure is taking control leading to a calming wind and clear skies. Overnight lows will fall into the 40s & 50s; coolest spots will be the Adirondacks and the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont. It sets the stage for a stunning day Tuesday. After some patchy fog thins out, we've got mostly sunny skies to look forward to. Highs will respond nicely, climbing into the upper 70s & low 80s. Humidity will stay low, the comfort level will be high!

Tuesday evening, clouds will thicken up and I can't rule out a stray shower over northern New York; the rest of us will be dry while the sun is up. Tuesday night, showers and a few thunderstorms will spread across the northeast. Lows, thanks to more clouds, will be warmer, only falling into the low to mid 60s. Spotty showers and a few thunderstorms will continue off and on while a cold front lays over the area. I'm not too concerned about severe storms but a few lightning flashes and downpours are possible. Outside of showers and storms, highs will climb into the upper 70s.

Wednesday night, the front moves away but lighter showers and clouds will linger. Overnight lows will fall into the middle & upper 50s. Thursday is September 1 and it'll feel like fall is coming soon! Highs during the day will struggle to get into the low 70s while some stubborn clouds float by. Most of us will be dry but a few light showers will meander over the Northeast Kingdom. To add insult to chilly injury, strong northwest winds will be going at least 10-15mph. Friday and Saturday will stay sunny and comfortably cool; highs will be in the 60s to near 70°. Sunday and Labor Day will be more 'normal' under a good amount of sun and highs near 80°. All-in-all, it'll be a pretty perfect holiday weekend, let's hope it stays that way!

-Meteorologist Sean Parker

All fun at the Champlain Valley Fair Monday with a new addition, professional pumpkin carving.

Greg Grady of Derry, New Hampshire is a professional sculptor and gained his interest, now life work from his father.

This is his first year at the Champlain Valley Fair, and he was happy to answer questions from the public.

Grady spent Monday carving his first pumpkin of the season, and told us depending on the amount of detail of his design he can spend up to multiple hours working.

It's been five years since Tropical Storm Irene ravaged the Green Mountain State. Homes were destroyed, businesses were lost, and state infrastructure sustained hundreds of millions in damage. But people in one Southern Vermont town are proud of the recovery work they've put forward.

More than 300 homes impacted, five hundred miles of roads and bridges washed away, Tropical Storm Irene has left lasting effects on the state. Communities have worked their way back. but admit they'll never forget. "On Sunday morning when we got up we were laughing that this hurricane was nothing. Another joke," commented Marty Banak, as he worked along his property Monday. He spend the day clearing trees, building a new foundation.

But he had a hard time focusing, thinking back to how wrong he turned out to be. "I'd swear that in 20 minutes on the bridge, the covered bridge in Quechee, the water rose 4 feet in 20 minutes," he reflected. Banak lives just outside the Quechee village. He says the community has made great strides in just 5 years, working it's way back from tremendous damage.

"There were just areas you couldn't get to. You couldn't get to Stockbridge, you couldn't get to Killington. Whole miles and miles of roads washed out. Graves unearthed, just unbelievable," said Pete Meijer. He's been in the Quechee area his entire life, he's experienced Tropical Storm Irene, as well as the 100 year flood that hit Quechee in 1973. He says 2011 was much worse. "The only way I can describe it, is like a slow motion train wreck. It was just this gradual, like a locomotive going out of control," he stated.

Banak and Meijer say most people took precautions before waters rushed through, but admit it was hard to stand by and watch the destruction occur. "There was a lot of whispering and soft voices. I would have to say that's what struck me, conversations were not there normal conversations. People were in hushed tones, not talking a lot," stated Banak.

But things have changed. The two say a great recovery effort was taken throughout the region. The Quechee covered bridge, has been rebuilt. It stands as proof of the community's resilience. Banak and Mejier are proud of the work, but they're staying prepared for the worst. "I would say 5 years later, when it starts to rain really heavy, it still brings out some nervous tendencies. It's good to be on your guard, it's good to be prepared. I don't think I'd ever want to see another storm like that," reflected Meijer.

The lives of six Vermonters were lost due to Tropical Storm Irene. It'll go down as the worst natural disaster the state has suffered in nearly 100 years.

It's been five years since Irene's flood water destroyed downtown Brandon, Vermont.

The town has since bounced back, if not ahead, rebuilding a stronger community.

Walking in downtown Brandon five years post Irene, it would be difficult to find any sign a major flood hit the area.

Town Manager David Atherton describes his town as one that "likes to take action and not watch it go by."

The heart of Brandon sits over the Neshobe River, and after the region received five to seven inches of rain, flooding was inevitable.

The Neshobe River spilled onto State Route 7, inundating several of the town's popular businesses.

"There was a pizza shop (Brandon House of Pizza), and the pizza shop was lifted off it's foundation and moved about 20 feet out onto route 7," Bernie Carr said.

Carr own's Carr's Florist & Gifts only a few doors down from the former Brandon House of Pizza. He recalls watching the water rise over it's banks and flooding his own shop.

The town is no stranger to damaging floods; it was hard hit during the flood of 1927, and again in 1938.

Now the town is working to mitigate future flooding by installing a large culvert under the downtown, across Route 7.

Ethan Swift with Vermont Agency of Natural Resources said, "We just received a FEMA grant to build an overflow culvert."

The project will divert future flood water, and will protect the downtown during any future flooding.

The town of Brandon hopes to start the project before the end of 2016.

When backpacks get packed and buses get loaded next week in Plattsburgh, there will be a new superintendent leading the Plattsburgh City School District.

He's a familiar face in the city.

Jay Lebrun had been associate superintendent in Plattsburgh for 9 years before he got the promotion in July.

He worked on the business side of things, including budgeting, taxation and purchasing.

"I think it's a useful area to have in your background," he said.

Former superintendent James Short retired at the end of the school year. Now Lebrun is the one at the top as the district's new superintendent.

The first part of his vision includes better aligning curriculum.

"We're also working hard on improving students writing skills and their literacy fluency," said Lebrun. "We've engaged a consultant."

He says some students graduate ill-prepared in writing, something that's reflected in common core test results.

"We have a number of initiatives that are going to work to integrate writing more into the curriculum and into a broad set of courses," said Lebrun.

For the last few years, parents of more than half of the district's 1,800 students have opted to take them out of common core testing.

"With such limited participation, I think it's really hard to use that as an indicator of our teacher quality," he said. "So that's an area where I don't think the state gave due consideration to."

In a time when a lot of districts are still facing budget cuts, Lebrun has a state-certified teacher shortage.

He says subjects involved include music, technology and secondary special education.

"Our new reality is to have to search further and longer for applicants and candidates and at times, I think that schools are going to have to make use of uncertified or otherwise-certified teachers," he said.

Gender neutral bathrooms have been a hot button issue in schools across the country.
In Plattsburgh, for Lebrun, it's a no brainer.

"We want to provide choice and allow students to choose the facilities which best fit their comfort level, their comfort area, their gender-expression," he said. "We have, on an informal basis and in conjunction with families, made arrangements for several years now for students, but more visibly and more formally this year there will be gender neutral facilities available."

Those will be in both the middle and high schools.

As for budgets, Lebrun says he hopes to keep taxes and programming relatively steady.

Looking ahead to next summer, Lebrun says security work will be done on the high school.

He says the fifty year old layout of the building isn't the most efficient approach to security.

The upgrades will improve sight lines and provide better direct access.

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department is celebrating the success of the Vermont Duck Stamp Program.

"The Vermont Duck Stamp program has been responsible for some of our state's greatest conservation success stories," said Louis Porter, commissioner of the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department.

"The waterfowl hunters, birders, and others who have purchased a Duck Stamp within the past 30 years have allowed us to preserve a wide array of wetlands throughout Vermont that will remain forever wild and accessible to the public," added Porter.

Officials say since 1986 the Vermont Duck Stamp Program has raised $4.5 million to help with the conservation of almost 12,000 acres on 93 different projects.

If you would like to attend the celebration, it's at the Mallet's Creek Wildlife Management Area on Thursday, September 8, from 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

You can find out more about the Vermont Duck Stamp Program by clicking here.

New Hampshire officials say a teenager from Bedford has died after drowning in North Pond in the town of Stark.

Investigators say on Saturday morning crews recovered the body of Syed Mansoor Bilal, 17, from the pond. The teen had been boating with 3 others just before 1 a.m. early Saturday morning when the canoe overturned.

According to police, 911 was called for help after three of the boaters made it to shore but Bilal did not. Crews from New Hampshire Fish and Game, NH Marine Patrol, NH State Police, Stark Fire Department, Groveton Fire Department and Shelburne Fire Department all searched for the missing teen.

Police say the case is still under investigation but alcohol and drugs appear to be a contributing factor.

A New Hampshire food bank is collecting game meat from hunters to help feed those who need it.

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department says this fall New Hampshire Food Bank is doing the "Hunt for the Hungry program" The program gives game meat to more than 400 food pantries, soup kitchens, group and homeless centers.

"We are counting on continued strong support from hunters this year," said Bruce Wilson, Director of Operations for the New Hampshire Food Bank.

"Donations for protein foods fill a big need with the Hunt for the Hungry program. Venison is especially popular, a real treat for clients. Last year, we got some moose meat, and as soon as it came in, out it went! As always, we want to thank New Hampshire hunters and Lemay's for their continued support. We couldn't do what we do without their combined support," added Wilson.

Hunters who wish to donate can contact the New Hampshire Food Bank to get instructions on how to package the meat. The food bank can accept deer or moose meat, they cannot accept wild game fowl or bear meat.

For those who want to donate a whole deer or moose, you can bring it to Lemay & Sons Beef in Goffstown and they will process meat for no charge.

"The Hunt for the Hungry program is a great way for hunters to share their harvest and help needy families get through the winter," said Glenn Normandeau, Executive Director of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department. "Wild game is a local renewable resource that is high in protein, low in fat and all natural -- not to mention delicious."

Officials say in 2015 the "Hunt for the Hungry program" took in around 2,100 pounds of donated deer, moose and other game meat.

Responding to national outrage over high prices, Mylan announced plans Monday to launch a generic EpiPen at a 50 percent discount to the branded version of the life saving allergy treatment.

The generic EpiPen will be "identical" to the branded product in terms of how the drug is made and how the auto-injector functions, Mylan said.

The surprise move is the latest attempt by Mylan to silence the uproar ignited by a more than 400% increase in EpiPen prices. The launch comes ahead of looming competition from Teva Pharmaceuticals, which is hoping to launch a generic EpiPen of its own as early as next year, pending FDA approval.

Mylan said it plans to launch the generic version in "several weeks" at a cost of $300 per two-pack carton, compared with $608 for the branded EpiPen.

Mylan didn't specify what discounts -- if any -- it is offering on this $300 generic price. It's also not clear why consumers would buy the more expensive branded EpiPen if, as Mylan describes it, it's exactly the same as the generic.

The company didn't respond to a request for comment.

Under pressure from angry parents and politicians last week, Mylan said it will provide instant savings cards worth $300 to patients who have to pay the full price for the drug out of pocket.

However, Mylan has so far stopped short of announcing an actual price cut.

Public Citizen, a consumer rights group, argues that the "weirdness" of a drug company offering a generic version of its own branded but off-patent product is a "signal that something is wrong."

"The company must roll back its unjustified and outrageous price increases," Robert Weissman, president of Public Citizen, said in a statement.

Mylan CEO Heather Bresch said in a statement on Monday: "We understand the deep frustration and concerns associated with the cost of EpiPen to the patient,"

Like last week, CEO Bresch again attempted to shift the blame away from the company and towards a health care system she has called "broken."

The "complexity and opaqueness of today's branded pharmaceutical supply chain" led Mylan to determine that "bypassing the brand system" was the "best option," Bresch said.

Bernstein analysts wrote that the move is "quite costly" for the company because it will reduce the revenue per prescription.

The "Ten Best Days of Summer" are well underway. Local 22 and Local 44 in the morning is broadcasting live from the Champlain Valley Fair all week!

On Monday, the animals were the stars of the show! We met the chicks, piglets, and other animals, you can too! The fair and animal barns open at 10am and there are multiple shows, highlighting animals, throughout the day.

Monday is Kids Day which means kids get $1 off of the ticket cost. For more information you can visit the Fair's website, the entire schedule for Monday is below:

Monday, August 29 - Kids Day Grandstand Entertainment - Wunderlee Circus Extravaganza - Free with gate admission
VT Music Showcase on the Koffee Kup Stage - Toni Catlin
Music Gazebo - Will Clifford 10:00 Ayrshire Jr. Fitting & Showmanship followed by Ayrshire, Brown Swiss & Milking Shorthorn Open Shows Cattle Tent 10:00 Childrens Activitity Expo North Garden Center 10:30 Dye Day Fiber Loft 11:00 Comedic Juggler Robert Clarke Expo Plaza 11:00 Ag Mound Presentation Ag Mall 11:00 Vermont Music Showcase Adsit Mall 11:00 Early Trades Presentation Red Gate 11:30 Sheep & Shepherd Presentation Sheep Tent 11:30 McKenzie Racing Pigs Yellow Gate 12:00 Steve Bayner Adsit Mall 12:30 Cooking Demo Ware Building 12:30 Kachunga Behind Ware Building 12:30 Nerveless Nocks Midway 1:00 Professional Pumpkin Carving Demonstration Expo North 1:00 K-9's in Flight Ag Mall 1:00 Vermont Music Gazebo State Building Lawn 1:30 McKenzie Racing Pigs Yellow Gate 2:00 Ayrshire Futurity Cattle Tent 2:00 Ag Mound Presentations Ag Mound 2:00 Early Trades Presentation Red Gate 2:00 Vermont Music Showcase Adsit Mall 2:30 Kachunga Behind Ware Building 3:00 Comedic Juggler Robert Clarke Expo Plaza 3:30 Steve Bayner Adsit Mall 3:30 Cooking Demo Ware Building 3:30 McKenzie Racing Pigs Yellow Gate 4:00 K-9's in Flight Ag Mall 4:00 Nerveless Nocks Midway 4:00 Vermont Music Gazebo State Building Lawn 4:30 Judging for the Best King Arthur Flour Whoopie Pie Contest Ware Building Annex 4:30 Sheep & Shepherd Presentation Sheep Tent 5:00 Parade Thoughout Grounds 5:00 Milking Demonstrations Milking Parlor 5:30 Vermont Music Showcase Adsit Mall 5:30 McKenzie Racing Pigs Yellow Gate 5:30 Cooking Demo Ware Building 6:00 Carved & Painted Pumpkin Judging Expo North Garden Center 6:00 Comedic Juggler Robert Clarke Expo Plaza 6:15 Vermont Music Gazebo State Building Lawn 6:30 Steve Bayner Adsit Mall 6:30 Kachunga Behind Ware Building 6:30 Ag Mound Presentation Ag Mound 6:30 Early Trades Presentation Red Gate 7:00 Nerveless Nocks Midway 7:30 K-9's in Flight Ag Mall 7:30 McKenzie Racing Pigs Yellow Gate

Brittney Hibbs talks with Burlington Beer Company about its newest double IPA made with more than 600 pounds of peaches.

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